Junit wait until

Listing out the different WebDriver Wait statements that can be useful for an effective scripting and can avoid using the Thread. Purpose : Selenium WebDriver has borrowed the idea of implicit waits from Watir.

This means that we can tell Selenium that we would like it to wait for a certain amount of time before throwing an exception that it cannot find the element on the page.

We should note that implicit waits will be in place for the entire time the browser is open. This means that any search for elements on the page could take the time the implicit wait is set for. Purpose : Each FluentWait instance defines the maximum amount of time to wait for a condition, as well as the frequency with which to check the condition.

Furthermore, the user may configure the wait to ignore specific types of exceptions whilst waiting, such as NoSuchElementExceptions when searching for an element on the page. Purpose : Models a condition that might reasonably be expected to eventually evaluate to something that is neither null nor false. Purpose : Sets the amount of time to wait for a page-load to complete before throwing an error.

If the timeout is negative, page loads can be indefinite. Purpose : Sets the amount of time to wait for an asynchronous script to finish execution before throwing an error. If the timeout is negative, then the script will be allowed to run indefinitely. Purpose : This is rarely used, as it always force the browser to wait for a specific time. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website.

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TimeUnit; import org. Alert; import org. By; import org. WebDriver; import org. FirefoxDriver; import org. ExpectedConditions; import org. TimeUnit. Alert. WebDriver. FirefoxDriver. ExpectedConditions. WebDriverWait. This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information.

I don't know how to make my test wait for the process to end it is not exactly a unit test, it is more like an integration test as it involves several classes and not just one. IMHO it's bad practice to have unit tests create or wait on threads, etc. You'd like these tests to run in split seconds.

That's why I'd like to propose a 2-step approach to testing async processes. An alternative is to use the CountDownLatch class.

NOTE you can't just used syncronized with a regular object as a lock, as fast callbacks can release the lock before the lock's wait method is called. See this blog post by Joe Walnes. You can try using the Awaitility library. It makes it easy to test the systems you're talking about. If you use a CompletableFuture introduced in Java 8 or a SettableFuture from Google Guavayou can make your test finish as soon as it's done, rather than waiting a pre-set amount of time.

Your test would look something like this:. Start the process off and wait for the result using a Future. One method I've found pretty useful for testing asynchronous methods is injecting an Executor instance in the object-to-test's constructor. In production, the executor instance is configured to run asynchronously while in test it can be mocked to run synchronously. In production, I would construct Foo with an Executors.

The general approach to testing this stuff is to:. But that's a lot of boilerplate for one test. The benefit of this over the CountdownLatch approach is that it's less verbose since assertion failures that occur in any thread are properly reported to the main thread, meaning the test fails when it should.

A writeup that compares the CountdownLatch approach to ConcurrentUnit is here.

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I also wrote a blog post on the topic for those who want to learn a bit more detail. How about calling SomeObject. Using static imports, the test reads kinda nice. You can also use f. I find an library socket. It looks simple and brief way using LinkedBlockingQueue. Here is example :. And set timeout to avoid assuming too much time to wait the result.

There are many answers here but a simple one is to just create a completed CompletableFuture and use it:. I am just making sure all of this stuff gets called anyway.

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This technique works if you are using this code:. It's worth mentioning that there is very useful chapter Testing Concurrent Programs in Concurrency in Practice which describes some unit testing approaches and gives solutions for issues.

Avoid testing with parallel threads whenever you can which is most of the time. This will only make your tests flaky sometimes pass, sometimes fail.

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Never just call get or join in your tests, else your tests might run forever on your CI server in case the future never completes.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

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Testing Multi-Threaded and Asynchronous Code

Change your preferences any time. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I have a JUnit test that I want to have wait for a period of time, synchronously. My JUnit test looks like this:. I tried Thread. Is there some trick to it, or do I need a different monitor?

If you are waiting on a rest request for example maybe it usually return in 5 seconds, but if you set your sleep for 5 seconds the day your request comes back in 10 seconds your test is going to fail. To remedy this JayWay has a great utility called Awatility which is perfect for ensuring that a specific condition occurs before you move on.

In case your static code analyzer like SonarQube complaints, but you can not think of another way, rather than sleep, you may try with a hack like: Awaitility.

The best way, of course, is to pass a Callable, with your appropriate condition, rather than truewhich I have. You can use java. TimeUnit library which internally uses Thread. The syntax should look like this :. This library provides more clear interpretation for time unit. You could also use the CountDownLatch object like explained here. There is a general problem: it's hard to mock time.

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So, for making a scheduling API testable, I used an interface with a real and a mock implementation like this:. An advanced multi-threading mock for Clock is much more complex, of course, but you can make it with ThreadLocal references and a good time synchronization strategy, for example. Learn more. How can I make a JUnit Test wait? Ask Question. Asked 7 years ago. Active 7 months ago. Viewed 86k times. Kylar Kylar 7, 4 4 gold badges 38 38 silver badges 70 70 bronze badges. Active Oldest Votes.

How about Thread. Muel Muel 3, 1 1 gold badge 19 19 silver badges 31 31 bronze badges. If you are using code analysis tools like sonarqube they will complain about Thread. It creates brittle tests that can fail unpredictably depending on environment "Passes on my machine! Don't rely on timing use mocks or use libraries such as Awaitility for asynchroneous testing. This answer should be removed, and considered harmful.

A much better answer below is stackoverflow. It has a nice fluent api as well await. Ben Glasser Ben Glasser 2, 1 1 gold badge 20 20 silver badges 34 34 bronze badges.Posted by: admin November 15, Leave a comment. An implicit wait is to tell WebDriver to poll the DOM for a certain amount of time when trying to find an element or elements if they are not immediately available. The default setting is 0.

Once set, the implicit wait is set for the life of the WebDriver object instance. Using the solution provided by Mike Kwan may have an impact in overall testing performance, since the implicit wait will be used in all FindElement calls. With the implicit wait these operations would wait for the whole timeout to expire before throwing the exception.

The default implicit wait is set to 0 seconds. This method also supports waiting until the element is displayed. Here is the workaround.

Wait Commands

Add the wait line below. Realistically, the problem was the click or event that happened before this oneā€”line 1 in my C code. I see multiple solutions already posted that work great! However, just in case anyone needs something else, I thought I would post two solutions that I personally used in selenium C to test if an element is present!

Hope it helps, cheers! Here is my solution, you do not want to wait to long before the element changes.

junit wait until

In this code the webdriver waits for 2 seconds before it continues. Was searching how to wait in Selenium for condition, landed in this thread and here is what I use now:. February 21, c Leave a comment. Questions: Closed. This question needs to be more focused. It is not currently accepting answers. Want to improve this question? Update the question so it focuses on one problem only by editing this p Questions: I really enjoy using the aggregate functions that C provides such as.

Anybut I struggle to understand what my options are just looking from the method signature: Can someone help me be Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Add menu.The conventional wisdom is that threads and tests should not mix. Usually this works out fine because the thing that you really want to test just happens to run inside of a multi-threaded system and can be tested individually without the use of threads. The software police will not arrest you for firing up a thread in a unit test, though how to actually go about testing multi-threaded code is another matter. Some excellent asynchronous technologies like Akka and Vert.

junit wait until

But outside of these, testing multi-threaded code usually requires a different approach than a typical synchronous unit test. The first step is to kick off whatever threaded action you wish to test the outcome of.

Looks good. This seems better. JUnit only knows about the main thread that it executes our test in. So while the message bus is busy trying to deliver our message, the test finishes execution in the main test thread and JUnit reports success.

The solution? We need the main test thread to wait for the message bus to deliver our message. Our test is green and the Received statement prints out as expected.

But having a 1 second sleep means our test takes at least one second to run - no good. We could lower the sleep time, but then we risk the test ending before the message is received. Looking at the java.

How about a CountDownLatch? The main thread is made to wait on the latch and the test thread releases the waiting main thread by calling countDown on the latch after the message has been received. We no longer need to sleep for 1 second, our test only takes as long as it needs to. Consider the message bus scenario: the latch is made to wait, but it only releases after a message is received. If the bus is broken and the message is never delivered then our test never completes.

Now our test that was blocking fails after 1 second with a TimeoutException. Eventually we find the problem and fix the test, but we decide to leave the timeouts in place. How can this be?

Consider our message handling test again:. We had to use a CountDownLatch to coordinate the completion of our test with the main test thread, but what about the assertion? If the assertion fails, will JUnit know? Ugh, the test is green! So now what do we do? We need a way to relay any test failures from the message handling thread back to the main test thread.

If a failure occurs in the message handling thread, we need it to be re-thrown in the main thread so that the test will fail as expected.

junit wait until

A quick run and yes, the test fails just as it should!By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. The dark mode beta is finally here. Change your preferences any time. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. If that is actually your working code, then just keep it like that.

junit wait until

None whatsoever. The real problem is that the thread that checks the value may not see a change that has happened for an arbitrarily long time due to caching. To ensure that the value is always synchronized between threads, you need to put the volatile keyword in the variable definition, i. Note that putting the access in a synchronized block, such as when using the notification-based solution described in other answers, will have the same effect.

You need a mechanism which avoids busy-waiting. However, starting a thread to do nothing but wait until it is needed is still not the best way to go. You could also employ an ExecutorService to which you submit as a task the work which must be done when the condition is met. Ok maybe this one should solve your problem. Note that each time you make a change you call the change method that releases the wait. I prefer to use mutex mechanism in such cases, but if you really want to use boolean, then you should declare it as volatile to provide the change visibility across threads and just run the body-less cycle with that boolean as a condition :.

Learn more. Wait until boolean value changes it state Ask Question. Asked 6 years, 6 months ago. Active 1 month ago. Viewed 88k times. I have a thread which wait for a boolean value to change like this: while! Is there any way to block the Thread, until the boolean value changes it state?

Active Oldest Votes. This is not my prefered way to do this, cause of massive CPU consumption. Michael Borgwardt Michael Borgwardt k 71 71 gold badges silver badges bronze badges. Marko Topolnik Marko Topolnik k 23 23 gold badges silver badges bronze badges. This helps me for testing the Quartz library inside of JUnit.

Quartz runs its jobs in a blackbox that has its own thread pool. I can signal JUnit to wait for the quartz jobs to complete using the exact pattern specified in the java doc. Can I suggest the Java. BlockingQueue and its various implementations?Posted by: admin January 4, Leave a comment. I have a JUnit test that I want to have wait for a period of time, synchronously. My JUnit test looks like this:. I tried Thread. Is there some trick to it, or do I need a different monitor?

If you are waiting on a rest request for example maybe it usually return in 5 seconds, but if you set your sleep for 5 seconds the day your request comes back in 10 seconds your test is going to fail. To remedy this JayWay has a great utility called Awatility which is perfect for ensuring that a specific condition occurs before you move on.

You could also use the CountDownLatch object like explained here. February 23, Java Leave a comment. Questions: I have a legacy app with has old JS code, but I want to utilize TypeScript for some of the newer components. Is it possible to tell wro4j to only apply the rhinoTypeScript preprocessor only Questions: I am facing this errors to run the default program of android studio.

Add menu. How can I make a JUnit Test wait? It has a nice fluent api as well await.


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